Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 102 Archaeology (4 Credits)

Provides an introduction to archaeological method and theory along with a survey of human world prehistory through the rise of great civilizations. In this course we will address questions relevant to the practice of archaeology: What is archaeology? Why do archaeologists dig holes? How do archaeologists know where to dig? What is material culture? How do archaeologists analyze and understand what they find? Topics include archaeological concepts, survey, excavation, analysis and interpretation of data, dating techniques, research methods and theories of cultural change.

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ANTH 103 Cultural Anthropology (4 Credits)

Provides an introduction to the diversity of human beliefs and behaviors around the world. Explores cross-cultural similarities and differences in systems of values, family, religion, economics, politics, and social structure, including issues of race and ethnicity. The goals of this course are to foster an appreciation of cultural diversity, to use this appreciation to better understand the student's culture(s), and to learn to be active and aware participants of local and global communities.

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ANTH 141 Film & Society: Race, Gender, and Class (2 Credits)

Examines the representation of race, social class and gender in film. Special attention is given to how particular representations reflect the broader historical context surrounding when the films were produced and culturally-based audience sentiments. Anthropological and sociological analyses of the films will be provided to give a multi-disciplinary account of how films reflect, create and support various ideological positions regarding race, class and gender. This course is also offered as SOC 141; students can not use credit from both courses.

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ANTH 142 Film & Society: Global Cultures (2 Credits)

Examines global issues in both foreign and domestic films from sociological and anthropological perspectives. Selected films cover topics that are relevant to understanding global processes such as global economy and Islam in the contemporary world, as well as films that address the more regionally localized processes of community and family. The purpose of the course is to use film to expose students to diverse perspectives and to encourage the critical awareness of the global interconnections that influence and constrain our modern lives. Films will include documentaries, as well as feature films.

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ANTH 143 Film & Society: Contemporary Issues (2 Credits)

Examines contemporary issues in film from sociological and anthropological perspectives. Selected films cover such topics as youth culture, nationalism, local culture and poverty, mental health or other social problems. The content of the films, as well as issues of film production, historical context and audience reception will be the major focus of analysis.

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ANTH 188 Special Studies: Anthropology (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

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ANTH 199 Selected Topics: Anthropology (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

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ANTH 202 Archaeology Of Oregon (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121 and ANTH 102.

Investigates the diverse nature of Oregon archaeology. Prehistoric patterns of human occupation in five distinct regions will be analyzed: the Great Basin, Columbia Plateau, Lower Columbia and Coast, Willamette Valley and the Southwestern Mountains. Furthermore, the course will investigate how the diversity of eco-scapes within Oregon shaped the manner in which humans culturally, technologically, and spiritually adapted to their environments.

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ANTH 234 Biological Anthropology (4 Credits)

An introduction to biological anthropology. The goal of this course is to achieve the basic scientific literacy necessary to understand and think critically about contemporary human variation, bio-cultural interactions, and five million years of human evolution. It examines the biological evidence for human evolution and population variation. Lecture topics include the mechanisms of evolution, cell biology and human genetics, primate behavior, the human fossil record, and modern human variation and adaptations.

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ANTH 235 Evolution of Human Sexuality (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: ANTH 234.

Examines the complex interplay between culture and biology in human sexual behavior with particular attention to anatomy and physiology as traits that have evolved from our primate and mammalian ancestors. Focus will be on theoretical issues in evolution and the implications of these theoretical models on human behavior. Topics include human mating systems across cultures, sexual selection, reproduction, physiological and hormonal processes, as well as the non-reproductive aspects of human sexuality and the physiological and hormonal processes of sexuality.

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ANTH 237 Forensic Anthropology (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: ANTH 234.

This course teaches the basic analysis of human remains for the medico-legal profession, and will cover the history of the discipline, the human skeleton, determining postmortem interval, trauma evaluation, and individual identification. It will also cover the investigation of crime scenes, the role of the forensic anthropologist, and case studies from a number of various situations.

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ANTH 240 Language and Culture (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

An introduction to the relationship between communication and culture. Designed to help students become familiar with and understand the mechanics of language from brain structure to how we make sounds; cross-cultural and historical variations between and within communicative systems; and language as a form of social interaction, specifically exploring the complex and diverse relationships between language, socio-cultural, politics and identity.

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ANTH 250 Food and Culture (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Provides an introduction to the diversity of food ways and the cultural significance of food and eating around the world. Topics explored will include food rules and rituals, consumption and health, food movements, food scarcity and poverty, global movement of foods, as well as the gendered dimensions of food and eating, with particular focus on body and body image. By the end of the course, students will have gained a broad-ranging familiarity with the cultural, political and economic aspects of past and present human food systems and be able to recognize and analyze the social linkages and hierarchies embedded in food systems.

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ANTH 254 Magic, Witchcraft, Religion (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces students to the subject of religion in the broad anthropological context, contributes to a deeper awareness of diverse expressions of religious faith in a multicultural world, and promotes openness to and tolerance of world views different from the student's own.

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ANTH 283 Introduction to Medical Anthropology (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces the main theories, concepts, and methods of exploring health, illness, disease and health care systems from a medical anthropological perspective. Uses a cultural interpretive approach to explore health beliefs, healing practices, and healer's and patient's roles within the context of world health care systems. Includes an examination of the biomedical model of health care as a cultural construct created through Western belief systems. P/NP grading.

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ANTH 295 Gender and Sexuality in an Anthropological Perspective (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121 and ANTH 103.

Examines the constructions of femininities, masculinities and sexualities from a cross-cultural perspective. The cross-cultural focus will provide students with the comparative framework necessary to understand the diversity of gender roles within the context of specific cultural, political and economic processes. While exploring how both Western and non-Western cultures from diverse parts of the world imagine, negotiate, and even contest gender identities and relations, this course will also address key theoretical issues and anthropological approaches to understanding gender.

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ANTH 298 Independent Study: Anthropology (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

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ANTH 299 Selected Topics: Anthropology (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

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