Outdoor Leadership (OL)

OL 111 Introduction to Outdoor Leadership (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: WR 065 or higher.

Designed to introduce students to the field of outdoor recreation, outdoor education, adventure education, therapeutic recreation, and experiential education. Upon completion of this course, students should have a good understanding of the differences between the subspecialties in the field. Includes the history of programs, an introduction to theories, current topics, career options, and preparation needed for those careers. Course may help students decide if an educational path in outdoor leadership is something they wish to pursue. Guest speakers representing various careers/areas will present their experiences to the class. This course is a recommended foundation for other outdoor leadership program courses.

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OL 160 Processing the Experience (2 Credits)

Students will be introduced to a variety of creative processing tools to be used either during or after the experience. The use of a field journal for reflection notes, as well as for processing through creative pursuits like sketching or painting will be introduced, as will group-based processing tools like formal debriefs, creating skits and collaborative art projects.

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OL 171 Technical Skills for Outdoor Leadership (2 Credits)

Introduces basic skills, gear, and systems necessary for a variety of outdoor pursuits, including alpine mountaineering, challenge course and rock climbing. Provides an introduction to a variety of skills, with the intention of moving into more guide-oriented courses later in their program. Presents technical skills that will serve as a foundation for the advanced training in specific outdoor disciplines. Introduces gear, such as software (ropes, webbing, harnesses) and hardware (carabiners, friction devices); skills, such as knots, belaying, rappelling; and systems such as anchors, raises, lowers.

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OL 194AA Avalanche Level I Training and Companion Rescue (2 Credits)

Introduces the various factors that contribute to avalanche hazard including terrain, weather, snowpack, and the human component (good vs. bad decision making). Avalanche safety equipment such as transceivers, probes and shovels are also presented, with instruction on how to use each of these critical pieces of safety gear. Field time is spent on: 1) developing rescue skills, including transceiver search techniques (single and multiple burial), probing and shoveling; 2) snowpack assessment; and 3) safe travel practices / group travel skills.

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OL 194AB Avalanche Level I Refresher (1 Credit)

Recommended preparation: OL 194AA.

This course is designed to review the materials from Avalanche Level I, including the various factors that contribute to avalanche hazard including terrain, weather, snowpack, and the human component (good vs. bad decision making). Avalanche safety equipment such as transceivers, probes and shovels are also reviewed, along with how to use each of these critical pieces of safety gear. Field time is spent practicing transceiver search techniques (single and multiple burial), snowpack assessment (through a 'Test-pit Plus'), and safe travel practices and group travel skills. Students must have completed an Avalanche Level I course within the past five years.

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OL 194AC Avalanche Level II (2 Credits)

Recommended preparation: OL 194AA or OL 194AB.

This course is designed to build on the skills developed in an Avalanche Level I course. The various factors that contribute to avalanche hazard including terrain, weather, snowpack, and the human component (good vs. bad decision making) will be reviewed, as will avalanche safety equipment such as transceivers, probes and shovels and their correct use. New material will include use of a field notebook and standardized data recording, as well as completing full pit profiles. Field time is spent practicing and reviewing transceiver search techniques (single and multiple burial), snowpack assessment (through test pit, test pit plus, and full pit), and safe travel practices and group travel skills. Students must have completed an Avalanche Level I or Level I Refresher course within the past five years.

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OL 199 Selected Topics: Outdoor Leadership (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

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OL 207 Seminar in Outdoor Leadership (2 Credits)

This course will help prepare students for entering the job market and/or setting up a professional practicum through the following: where to search for jobs, how to apply and how to interview; and how to prepare professional resumes, cover letters, experience resumes and professional portfolios. Professional development opportunities such as conferences, certifications, trainings, etc. will be discussed, as will current research and trends in employment in fields related to outdoor leadership.

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OL 244 Psychology of Risk and Adventure (3 Credits)

Recommended preparation: or to be taken with WR 121.

Introduces students to psychological theories and topics relevant to adventure and risk, including perception, motivation, anxiety, arousal and risk-taking. This course will provide a theoretical and skills-based approach to understanding why the psychological components of risk and adventure play a pinnacle role in outdoor leadership.

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OL 251 Wilderness First Aid (1 Credit)

Designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to care for an injured or suddenly ill person in a remote location. The methods and protocols presented follow the Wilderness Medical Society guidelines for a 16 hour certification and are specific to a wilderness setting. The Wilderness Medical Society defines wilderness as a remote geographical location more than one hour from definitive care. Open to all and counts as an elective for Outdoor Leadership students.

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OL 253 Wilderness Advanced First Aid (3 Credits)

This Course is designed to provide the student with the necessary knowledge and skills to care for an injured or suddenly ill person in a remote location. The methods and protocols presented in this class follow the Wilderness Medical Society guidelines for a 36 hour certification and are specific to a wilderness setting. The Wilderness Medical Society defines wilderness as a remote geographical location more than one hour from definitive care.

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OL 255 Outdoor Living Skills (5 Credits)

Educates the student on how to travel safely for extended periods in the backcountry. Presents essentials of life (water, food and shelter/clothing) and how they can be provided in an outdoors setting. Also, discusses navigation, backcountry medicine and wilderness use/wilderness concepts. Lecture, discussion and lab (demonstration, practical application and practice) used. Students conduct one solo overnight and one group weekend outing. This course is a recommended foundation for other outdoor leadership program courses.

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OL 263 Basic Wilderness Life Support (5 Credits)

Basic Wilderness Life Support is a wilderness first responder course designed to provide an individual with an in-depth knowledge of wilderness medicine and the basic skills to treat the most common injuries and illnesses encountered in the wilderness. This course is appropriate for those who spend a lot of time in remote locations (professionally or recreationally). The methods and protocols presented in this class follow the Wilderness Medical Society guidelines for a 74 hour certification and are specific to a wilderness setting. The Wilderness Medical Society defines wilderness as a remote geographical location more than one hour from definitive care. Students are required to complete a 1 credit CPR course with certification in order to satisfy the BWLS certification. A specific section of the American heart Association’s Healthcare Provider CPR course will be offered exclusively for BWLS students. Registration for the CPR class will be separate from registration for the BWLS class.

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OL 271 Facilitating Group Experiences (5 Credits)

Prerequisites: OL 111, OL 263, OL 255 and WR 121.

Introduces the broad concepts of group facilitation and presents the various "generations" of adventure facilitation. Students will become familiar with various models of the facilitation process and how each relates to experiential learning. Coursework integrates introductory concepts of leadership, foundational experiential education theory and the practice of facilitation in a variety of modes, including both high and low elements. Students are responsible for facilitating various group initiatives as a way to further comprehend the concepts presented. Successful students will be prepared to effectively and confidently facilitate groups in a variety of learning environments. This is a foundation course and a recommended preparation for other outdoor leadership program courses.

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OL 273 Outdoor Recreation Leadership (5 Credits)

Prerequisites: OL 111, OL 263, OL 255 and WR 121.

This course is designed to provide both theoretical and practical knowledge of group leadership in an outdoor setting. Topics will be presented in lecture, discussed in various leadership scenarios, and then applied in group outings that the students will plan and lead. Special emphasis will be placed on group safety issues and risk assessment/risk management.

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OL 280 Co-op Work Experience-OL (2 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: complete a minimum of three OL classes.

Provides practicums by the department in conjunction with the community in outdoor recreation, outdoor education, adventure education, environmental education, experiential education, and wilderness therapy. Students must be approved for enrollment by an HHP-OL advisor before registering for this course. P/NP grading.

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OL 294AC Alpine Climbing (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: OL 171, OL 271, OL 273.

Designed to introduce the student to guiding, teaching and leading technical mountain travel with specific emphasis on rock, snow, and ice anchors; glacier travel and crevasse rescue; and climbing steeper snow and ice. Additional relevant topics may also be introduced (e.g., avalanche safety, high altitude).

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OL 294CA Canoe Program Instruction and Guiding (3 Credits)

Prerequisites with concurrency: OL 271 and OL 273.

Introduce students to guiding, teaching and leading flat and moving water canoe programs. May also introduce swift water rescue, whitewater techniques, etc.. Students will be instructed on the use of a variety of canoeing equipment and techniques used for travel by canoe within instructing/guiding situations (this course will teach much of the preliminary level material). Topics will include such areas as: water dynamics, rescue, client care and welfare, managing a group setting, risk assessment, as well as specific technical skills. Emphasis will be placed on advanced technical skill development and practical application. Although some time will be spent canoeing, this is not an activity course; all aspects of the course will be designed to teach the basic concepts of leading others in a variety of canoeing situations.

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OL 294MB Mountain Bike Guiding and Trail Stewardship (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: OL 271 and OL 273.

This course is designed to instruct the student how to provide a fun and safe guided mountain bike experience to people of all ages through a combination of field lecture and hands-on practice. Students will learn how to teach basic mountain bike skills, design and lead group trips, diagnose trailside mechanical issues and perform basic trailside bike maintenance, and understand the characteristics and importance of sustainable mountain bike trail development and stewardship. The majority of the class time for this course will be spent in the field.

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OL 294RC Teaching Rock Climbing (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: OL 171, OL 271 and OL 273.

This course is designed as an introduction to guiding/teaching rock climbing. Students will be instructed on the use of a variety of climbing equipment and techniques used for top-roped and lead climbing in guiding/teaching situations (this course will not teach beginning level material except in how to teach such material to a beginner student/client/friend). Topics will include such areas as: client care and welfare, managing a group setting, risk assessment, as well as technical skills. Emphasis will be placed on group work, discussion and practical application. Although some time will be spent climbing, this is not an activity course; all aspects of the course will be designed to teach the basic concepts of leading others in a variety of rock climbing situations.

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OL 294WG Whitewater Raft Guiding (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: OL 271, OL 273 and OL 171.

This course is designed to instruct the student on how to provide a fun and safe whitewater raft experience to people of all ages through a combination of lecture and hands-on practice. Students will learn how to guide paddle rafts and oar rafts, read whitewater, lead group trips, and execute various whitewater rescue techniques. The majority of the class time for this course will be spent in the field, including overnight camping, and a variety of weather conditions may be encountered. A background in camping or outdoor living skills is strongly recommended. Please dress appropriately.

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OL 298 Independent Study: OL (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

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