Humanities

Humanities

Humanities is the study of the expression of the human experience. Courses in literature, film, culture, and writing are offered. Students develop the ability to apply creative skills to problem solving, analyzing and evaluating information, thinking critically, and communicating effectively.

See the Humanities page for more information.

Contact:

Tony Russell
541-383-3795
Ochoco Hall, Bend Campus

Department: Humanities
Department Chair: Tony Russell

Courses

ENG 104 Introduction to Literature: Fiction (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Explores human purpose, literary structures, and cultural values within a variety of short stories and/or novels. Features close reading, interpretation and evaluation of selected works of fiction, with attention to authors’ contexts and their creative processes, narrative elements, and reader responses. Explores topics and literatures from diverse viewpoints, backgrounds, and perspectives.

View Course Outline

ENG 105 Introduction to Literature: Drama (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Examines drama as literature, through its traditions, imaginative purposes and organizing visions, such as tragedy, comedy and realism. Close reading and interpretation of selected plays with attention to the cultural contexts of their creation and to the literary dimensions of character, dialogue, plot, setting, language and theme. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 106 Introduction to Literature: Poetry (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Examines critical and personal pleasures of poetry as a powerful and compact means to express feelings and ideas and respond to the varieties of human experience. Explores a wide range of poetry with attention to poets’ roles, literary traditions and poetic strategies expressed through tone, speaker, situation and event, theme, irony, language, images, sounds, rhythms, symbols, open and closed poetic forms.

View Course Outline

ENG 107 Western World Literature: Ancient (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Explores origins of Western culture through a study of representative Greek, Roman and other literary philosophical and historical texts. Mythology and the hero's quest as incorporated in Homer and Virgil may form the core of the readings. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 108 Western World Literature: Middle Ages (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Survey of representative texts explores Middle Ages, Renaissance, up to the 18th century Enlightenment, including rise of Christianity, chivalry, and the vision quest. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 109 Western World Literature: Modern (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Surveys representative texts, authors, and genres from the late 18th century to the present; explores modern Western world literary movements and their historical-intellectual contexts, from romanticism and realism to post-colonialism and contemporary global trends. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 180 Co-op Work Experience English and Literature (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Provides experience in which students apply previous classroom learning in an occupational setting. Credits depend on the number of hours worked. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

ENG 188 Special Studies: Literature (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

ENG 199 Selected Topics: Literature (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

ENG 201 Shakespeare (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Study representative plays from Shakespeare's early and middle periods and sonnets relevant to play elements.

View Course Outline

ENG 202 Shakespeare (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

The major plays of Shakespeare's middle and later periods. May also include selected study of his sonnets. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 204 Survey British Literature I (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Examines representative texts from the heroic age (Medieval) through the Enlightenment (18th century). Literary forms such as the epic, chivalric romance, morality play and folk ballad, lyric and narrative poetry, drama, the speculative essay, prose non-fiction and the novel are studied. Explores relations between texts and their cultural and historic contexts. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 205 Survey British Literature II (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Examines representative texts from the Romantic period through Contemporary literature. The romance of nature, industrial growth, urban experience, the rise of new class identities and alienation of the individual are themes in this period. Literary forms such as lyric and narrative poetry, short stories, the novel, and the drama of social realism and literature of the absurd are studied. Explores relations between texts and their cultural and historical contexts. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 212 Autobiography (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Examines diverse modes of autobiographical writing as texts that represent the self in society and where writers construct and represent memories. Explores the ways in which writers construct and represent memory and the impact these narratives have on our understanding of the political and cultural context in which they are produced. Explores autobiography from various places and periods.

View Course Outline

ENG 221 Introduction to Children's Literature (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Surveys children’s literature for all ages in genres that may include picture books, myths and folklore, poetry, nonfiction, historical fiction, and fantasy, making connections to the historical, cultural, institutional, and psychological contexts related to production and reception. Examines how texts represent childhood and reflect assumptions about the social and educational function of children’s and young adult literature.

View Course Outline

ENG 232C Topics in American Literature: Contemporary Fiction (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

In-depth study of several works of contemporary (late 20th/21st century) American fiction.

View Course Outline

ENG 250 Introduction to Folklore and Mythology (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Study of the systematic ways to explain how and why so many of the world's great religions, past and present, share similar stories, heroes and ways of attempting to understand and explain the unknowable. Analyzes tales from, among other locales, India, China, Africa, and North and South America. Some of the key myths include those of the Aztecs and Mayans, Native North Americans, the Sumerians and the Gnostics. The first few weeks of the course will provide an introduction to folklore. It will then provide insight into the social, psychological and aesthetic nature of mythology and an introduction to the theoretical approaches to understanding mythology.

View Course Outline

ENG 253 Survey American Literature I (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Reading and interpretation of writings from the diverse cultures which inhabited, colonized or developed this country through material from the Civil War period. Includes the Native American oral tradition, the journals of Columbus and other explorers, the diaries of settlers in the British colonies, and more traditional forms of literature through the mid-19th century. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 254 Survey American Literature II (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Covers selected works of American literature written during the late 19th century and the 20th century. Covers the transition from Realism and Naturalism to Modernism, the Jazz Age, the Harlem Renaissance, the Confessional and "Beat" poets and writers and late 20th century short fiction. Need not be taken in sequence.

View Course Outline

ENG 256 Folklore and US Popular Culture (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Explores the relationship between folklore and popular culture, with special emphasis on the analysis of legends, myths, icons, stereotypes, heroes, rituals, and celebrations.

View Course Outline

ENG 260 Introduction to Women Writers (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Focuses on the achievements and perspectives of women writers through critical analysis of their literary works and literary strategies. Uses a chronological, stylistic or thematic approach.

View Course Outline

ENG 288 Special Studies: Literature (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

ENG 299 Selected Topics: Literature (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

FA 101 Introduction to Film (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Focuses on audio-visual narratives, with an emphasis on how the collaborative process of combining cinematography, editing, sound, mise-en-scene, and acting constructs meaning and communicates ideas.

View Course Outline

FA 125 World Cinema (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduction to comparative study of compelling feature films and their directors from around the globe, analyzing subject matter, theme, genre, narrative structure, character, film style and technique as expressions of diverse cultural worldviews and distinctive artistic visions.

View Course Outline

FA 257 Literature Into Film (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Implements analysis of the structure of motion pictures to teach about structure of literature, allowing students to see the comparative strengths of each form. Aspects of narrative to be compared include plot and structure, character development, point of view, figurative discourse, symbol and allegory and means of controlling and expressing passage of time.

View Course Outline

FA 288 Special Studies: Film Arts (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

FA 298 Independent Study: Film Arts (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: Prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study in film arts to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student.

View Course Outline

FA 299 Selected Topics: Film Arts (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

HUM 107 Spanish Life and Culture (3 Credits)

Offered as a required course in the Barcelona Quarter study abroad program. The student will gain a broad overview of contemporary Spanish society by examining cultural traditions and values. Besides topical lectures by native guest lecturers, the course engages students in experiential learning through field trips to such historic and cultural sites as Gaudi's Barcelona, the Gothic quarter, and the Dali museum. (Elective credit only: Does not satisfy general education requirements)

View Course Outline

HUM 188 Special Studies: Humanities (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

HUM 199 Selected Topics: Humanities (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

HUM 210 Culture And Literature Of Asia (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introductory study of representative literary texts, films and related language arts, in English or in translation, of Asian regions and countries, such as China, India and Japan, examined in the context of their histories and cultural traditions.

View Course Outline

HUM 211 Culture and Literature of Africa (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introductory study of representative oral arts, literature, film and related creative arts, in English or in translation, of sub-Saharan African peoples, examined in context of their histories and cultural traditions.

View Course Outline

HUM 212 Culture and Literature of the Americas (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Interdisciplinary study of representative literary and historical texts (and other media) from Hispanic and Afro-Caribbean cultures of traditional, colonial and post-colonial origin.

View Course Outline

HUM 213 Culture and Literature of Middle East (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introductory study of representative Arabic, Persian and Hebrew literary texts in translation, placed in the context of films and other cultural media of the Middle East and Northern Africa.

View Course Outline

HUM 230 Immigrant Experience American Literature (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introductory survey of the immigrant experience in the United States as reflected in literature, autobiography and film.

View Course Outline

HUM 240 Native American Literature and Culture (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduction to traditional oral and contemporary Native American texts with an emphasis on cultural contexts and continuity. Considers Native American works in their national, historical, cultural, geographical, political, and legal contexts.

View Course Outline

HUM 255 Cultural Diversity in Contemporary American Literature (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

This course examines cultural diversity as recorded in American literature since 1965, emphasizing literary and cultural values in poetry, fiction, and drama. Readings focus on writers’ views of life within historically marginalized groups based on ethnicity, gender, and sexual identity.

View Course Outline

HUM 256 Introduction to African-American Literature (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Survey of African-American literature (selected fiction, autobiography, poetry and drama of the 19th and 20th centuries), placed in the context of major African-American achievements in the visual arts, music and film.

View Course Outline

HUM 261 Popular Culture: Science Fiction (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Focuses on the significance of science, technology and on such topics as the idea of the future and the "limits of the human" as revealed in popular culture through genres such as fiction, film, music, comics, anime and manga and advertising.

View Course Outline

HUM 262 Popular Culture: The American Western (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Historical study of the Western story and the cowboy hero in American culture through genres such as fiction, film, song, art and advertising.

View Course Outline

HUM 263 Popular Culture: Detective Stories (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Historical study of crime stories and the detective figure as revealed in popular culture through genres such as fiction, film, television, comics and journalism.

View Course Outline

HUM 264 Popular Culture: Spy Thriller (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Thematic study of espionage stories and the spy figure, as revealed in popular culture through genres such as fiction, film, advertising and journalism.

View Course Outline

HUM 265 Popular Culture: Noir Film and Fiction (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Historical, thematic and technical study of film noir and related fiction as a subversive force in popular culture.

View Course Outline

HUM 266 Popular Culture: Travel Literature (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Cross-cultural study of travel as exploration, personal narrative, anthropological inquiry and social criticism of places and peoples represented as "other" or "exotic." Examines popular culture as depicted in genres such as travel memoirs, journalism, advertising, educational videos and feature films that critique touristic assumptions.

View Course Outline

HUM 268 Digital Games Culture (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

This course will approach digital games through an academic socio-cultural lens, identifying key elements of evolving game studies theory, which considers digital game design, digital games play and digital games as a cultural practice that, in addition to play/entertainment, offers a new and developing medium for story-telling and learning.

View Course Outline

HUM 269 Popular Culture Graphic Novels (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Examines the role of comic books and graphic novels as cultural and artistic creations in popular culture and literature. Identifies a vocabulary for discussing, explaining, writing, and analyzing comics. Explores relevant social and historical events in the development of comics. May include comics to film comparisons or principal author studies .

View Course Outline

HUM 280 Co-op Work Experience Humanities (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Provides experience in which students apply previous classroom learning in an occupational setting. Credits depend on the number of hours worked. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

HUM 298 Independent Study: Humanities (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

HUM 299 Selected Topics: Humanities (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

J 188 Special Studies: Journalism (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

J 199 Selected Topics: Journalism (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

J 215 Publications Lab (1 Credit)

Recommended preparation: J 216.

Practical application of communications instruction through work on the student newspaper. Students are involved in all areas of production including reporting, photojournalism, advertising, production and distribution. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

J 216 News Reporting and Writing I (3 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces the basic process of journalistic reporting and writing used in all forms of news media. Emphasis is placed on organizing facts, observations, research, and background, in an effective narrative built on ethical, responsible journalistic practices. Students will develop a news judgment and distinguish among news, analysis and opinion.

View Course Outline

J 217 News Reporting and Writing II (3 Credits)

Recommended preparation: J 216.

A continuation of J 216 with emphasis placed on building on basic skills to report and write more complex stories, develop investigative stories, write editorials, and achieve a broader grasp of communication law.

View Course Outline

J 280 Journalism Practicum (1-3 Credits)

Community work experience in journalism (may include internships in local media). P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

J 298 Independent Study: Journalism (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

J 299 Selected Topics: Journalism (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

RD 099 Selected Topics: Reading (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

RD 199 Selected Topics: Reading (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

WR 060 Rhetoric and Critical Thinking I (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: Minimum placement Wr/Comm Level 3.

Introduce concepts of rhetorical reading, thinking, and writing as tools for college-level study. Establish an understanding and basic familiarity with key rhetorical concepts, such as audience and purpose, for both reading and writing. Reflect on their reading and writing as processes in order to understand their own practice as readers and writers. Demonstrate familiarity with using MLA conventions for format and citations in writing. Produce at least 1,500 words of revised, final draft copy, including at least one thesis-driven, minimum 750-word academic essay. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

WR 065 Rhetoric and Critical Thinking II (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 060 or minimum placement Wr/Comm Level 5.

Develop rhetorical reading, thinking, and writing skills as tools for success in reading and writing college level texts. Develop an understanding and basic fluency with key rhetorical concepts, such as audience and purpose, for both reading and writing. Evaluate their reading and writing as processes in order to examine and develop their own practice. Employ MLA conventions for format and citations in writing. Produce at least 2,000 words of revised, final draft copy, including at least one thesis-driven, minimum 1,000-word academic essay. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

WR 098 Writing Seminar (2 Credits)

Prerequisites: Minimum placement Wr/Comm Level 7.

Corequisites: WR 121.

A companion course to WR 121 for students who place into WR 098. Supports students by incrementally breaking down assignments while building self-efficacy and growth mindset to increase academic success. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

WR 099 Selected Topics: Writing (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

WR 121 Academic Composition (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: WR 065 or minimum placement Wr/Comm Level 9.

WR 121 focuses on rhetorical reading, thinking, and writing as a means of inquiry. Students will gain fluency with key rhetorical concepts and utilize these in a flexible and collaborative writing process, reflecting on their writing process with the goal of developing metacognitive awareness. They will employ conventions, including formal citations, appropriate for a given writing task, attending to the constraints of audience, purpose, genre, and discourse community. Students will compose in two or more genres.

View Course Outline

WR 122 Argument, Research, and Multimodal Composition (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: WR 121.

WR 122 continues the focus of WR 121 in its review of rhetorical concepts and vocabulary, in the development of reading, thinking, and writing skills, along with metacognitive competencies understood through the lens of a rhetorical vocabulary. Specifically, students will identify, evaluate, and construct chains of reasoning, a process that includes an ability to distinguish assertion from evidence, recognize and evaluate assumptions, and select sources appropriate for a rhetorical task. Students will employ a flexible, collaborative, and appropriate composing process, working in multiple genres, and utilizing at least two modalities.

View Course Outline

WR 188 Special Studies: Writing (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

WR 199 Selected Topics: Writing (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

WR 227 Technical Writing (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: WR 121.

Prepares students to produce instructive, informative, and persuasive technical documents. Grounded in rhetorical theory, the course focuses on producing usable, reader-centered content that is clear, concise, and ethical. Students will engage in current best practices and work individually and in groups to learn strategies for effective communication in the digital and networked, global workplace.

View Course Outline

WR 240 Introduction to Creative Writing: Nonfiction (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces the many forms and purposes of creative nonfiction such as science or nature writing, travel writing, memoir, biography, and journalistic essay. Requires individual and collaborative workshop activities to develop skills in drafting and revision. Examines topics, purposes for writing, and elements of craft, including voice, scene, description, and structure. Requires creation of a portfolio of works reflecting various stages of their writing process.

View Course Outline

WR 241 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces forms and genres of prose fiction. Uses individual and collaborative workshop activities to develop skills in drafting and revision, these may include critical reading of published authors, prose craft exercises and constructive response to other student work. Presents effective strategies for writing fiction and craft fundamentals including conflict and plot, story, character, dialogue, theme, setting, narration, and point of view. Includes creation of a portfolio of works reflecting various stages of the writing process.

View Course Outline

WR 242 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces the craft of poetry through study of the poetry and notebooks of established writers for writing techniques, forms, styles and work processes and through the writing and submission of original poems for class discussion and analysis.

View Course Outline

WR 243 Introduction to Creative Writing: Scriptwriting (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Introduces students to dramatic writing for both stage and screen. Essential learning processes in the course include scene and dialogue craft exercises, developing strong characters and viable narrative structures, critical reading of plays, screenplays, and/or teleplays, and responding constructively to other student work.

View Course Outline

WR 280 Co-op Work Experience Writing (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Provides experience in which students apply previous classroom learning in an occupational setting. Credits depend on the number of hours worked. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

WR 288 Special Studies: Writing (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

View Course Outline

WR 299 Selected Topics: Writing (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

View Course Outline

WS 101 Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: WR 121.

Offers an introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary field that asks critical questions about the meanings of sex and gender in society. Examines the issues raised for all genders by feminism and the women’s movement; integrates analysis of contemporary and historical experiences of women; and considers the multiple ways that sex and gender interact with race, class, nationality, and other social identities. Students will become familiar with key issues, questions, and debates in the field.

View Course Outline

Outside of
expected

Use the COCC Catalog to find extraordinary classes and degree programs. Start your journey here »