Cascade Culinary Institute

Cascade Culinary Institute

The Cascade Culinary Institute offers courses and programs to prepare students for immediate employment in baking and pastry arts, culinary arts, or hospitality industries. Students benefit from hands-on learning, small classes, and knowledgeable and accessible instructors with vast industry experience. The Jungers Culinary Center on the Bend campus combines the latest kitchen classroom technology, multiple cooking labs, a demonstration theater, and a fine-dining restaurant operated by students.  

The Cascade Culinary Institute’s Culinary Arts and Baking & Pastry Arts programs are accredited by the American Culinary Federation.

See the Cascade Culinary Institute page for more information.

Contact:

Laura Hagen
541-318-3751
Jungers Culinary Center, Bend Campus

Department: Cascade Culinary Institute
Department Chair: Wayne Yeatman 

Courses

BAK 100 Want to be a Pastry Chef? (2 Credits)

This course serves as an introduction to the field of baking and pastry arts. It is designed for students considering declaring Baking and Pastry Arts as a major; or those taking courses to enhance your placement scores to enter the next Cascade Culinary Institute cohort start. This course will enable students to experience an introduction to baking and pastry arts with a demonstration and hands on class that covers the basics of baking techniques and flavor profiling. Students will "get a taste" of the baking industry, while learning the secrets of being a successful pastry professional.

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BAK 101 Introduction to Baking & Pastry (4 Credits)

This introductory level course covers the basic theory and skill sets used throughout the field of baking and pastry. Topics covered include the use of hand tools and equipment found in a bakeshop, as well as the exploration of baking and pastry ingredients and their functions. Students will gain a working knowledge of the major methods such as creaming, blending, foaming, meringues, pre-cooked, cut-in, lamination, straight dough, custards, frozen desserts, chocolates, and sauces. Students will also taste and evaluate products they create in class to enhance their understanding of the course material.

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BAK 110 Baking and Pastry Foundations I (4 Credits)

Prerequisites with concurrency: CUL 102; CUL 104; and choose either WR 121 or BA 214.

Learn about the baking industry, nomenclature, equipment, kitchen operations, knife skills, baking techniques, science, ratios, and standardized recipes. Learn about and produce fruit desserts; cookies; meringues; pate a choux and basic custards.

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BAK 140 Baking and Pastry Foundations II (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 110.

Covers basic pastry dough production, the textural complexity of each dough, and their role in creating delicious pastries and desserts. Includes tart and pie dough, puff pastry, pâte a choux, crêpes, biscuits, shortbread, fritters, sweet yeasted doughs, strudel, phyllo, and cookies. Create a variety of products in each of these categories.

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BAK 170 Baking and Pastry Foundations III (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 110.

Produce quick breads and dessert foundation sauces, make and bake cake layers, and assemble classic cakes. Topics include menu planning and balancing flavors and textures in desserts.

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BAK 180 Custards and Frozen Desserts (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 110 or BAK 110.

Prepare and present a variety of custards, puddings, Bavarians, mousses, still-frozen, and churn-frozen desserts, ice creams, granitas, sorbets and sherbets.

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BAK 188 Special Studies: Baking and Pastry Arts (1-6 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the baking and pastry discipline.

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BAK 199 Selected Topics: Baking and Pastry Arts (1-6 Credits)

Provides a learning experience in baking and pastry arts not currently available; this course is in development to be proposed as a permanent course.

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BAK 210 Modern Sugar and Chocolate Decor (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 110 or CUL 110.

Prepare a variety of chocolate and sugar decorations and develop sculpting techniques. Learn tempering chocolate, use of molds, and transfer sheets. Practice various sugar techniques including pulled sugar, blown sugar, piped sugar, and poured sugar in addition to airbrushing techniques to create a variety of showpieces.

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BAK 215 Laminated Dough and Viennoiserie (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 140 or CUL 140.

Learn the basic principles of laminated dough and the art of viennoiserie. Prepare European and American enriched yeasted doughs including classic and contemporary varieties of brioche, croissants, Danish, yeasted coffee cakes, doughnuts and sweet rolls. Learn ingredient selection, product identification, retail merchandising, formulation, shaping, proofing, and baking quality laminated products.

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BAK 220 Wedding Celebration and Specialty Cakes (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 110 or CUL 110.

Learn the history of making celebration cakes including baking, assembly, and decorating. Bake sponge cakes, make buttercream, gum-paste flowers, royal icing piped decorations, and rolled fondant.Produce wedding and celebration cakes incorporating all of these elements, from design, baking, assembly, covering, and decorating.

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BAK 225 Entremets (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 140 or CUL 140.

Recommended preparation: BAK 180.

Learn principles and techniques of creating entremets. Lecture and lab topics include: the history of entremets, European design, technique, and assembly. Utilize a variety of techniques to create layers of flavor and texture while incorporating multiple finishing and decorating styles. Apply traditional and modern applications of glazing, and sugar and chocolate decor.

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BAK 230 Plated Desserts and Presentation (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 140 or CUL 140.

Recommended preparation: BAK 180.

Learn the principles and techniques of plated, banquet, buffet, and table-side desserts. Explore history, decor, purchasing, costing, flavor, presentation, and design sweet and savory desserts. Review high-volume production, portion control, and waste management. Create a final dessert incorporating all topics, including individual design, flavor, and decor.

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BAK 235S Classical French Pastries (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 140 or BAK 140.

Produce a variety of classical and modern French cakes or “entremets.” Decorate using printed logos, chocolate, and sugar. Utilize updated methods of traditional French recipes using fresh ingredients. Prepare classic French tarts, practicing different types of crusts, doughs, and fillings.

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BAK 240 The Craft of Artisan Breads (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 140 or BAK 101 and CUL 140.

Apply principles and techniques of preparing lean yeasted, rich, and sourdough bread including flatbreads, baguettes, brioche, bagels, pretzels, sourdough, and rye bread. Emphasizes regional and international bread, natural fermentation, and the use of various flours and grains. Practice and apply traditional and innovative baking, shaping, and finishing methods.

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BAK 245S Advanced Sugar Decor and Chocolate Sculpting (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 210.

Produce a variety of chocolate and sugar decorations using various techniques. Learn to apply chocolate colors with a spray gun, use molds, and make cutout decorations and silk screens. Explore various sugar techniques as pastillage, saturated sugar, pulled sugar (ribbons and flowers), blown, spun, piped, bubble, straw, and poured sugar and airbrushing techniques used to create a variety of showpieces.

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BAK 250 Petit Fours, Candies and Classical Mignardise (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 110 or BAK 110.

Make individual mini French pastries and petit fours such as éclairs, fruit tartelettes, macarons, and madeleines. Practice French pastry elements such as pastry cream, buttercream, glazes, cream-based, fruit-based, and chocolate-based fillings, and doughs. Create petit fours displays; make sugar confectioneries such as pâté de fruit, guimauve, praline, caramels, nougats, lollipops, and gummies. Learn how to package and display candies.

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BAK 255S Artisan Breads with Heirloom Whole Grains (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 110 or CUL 110.

Make a variety of specialty breads such as multigrain, rye, flax seed, organic baguette, and organic spelt. Make products with multiple flours, mixed fermentation techniques, and various production processes. Analyze different flours and the health and nutritional benefits of the breads made from them.

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BAK 260 Advanced Wedding, Celebration, and Specialty Cakes (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 220.

Practice advanced principles of baking, assembly, piping, and decorating of specialty cakes and wedding cakes. Learn design theory; including theme, color, texture, and flavor. Learn basic cake business practices such as selection of ingredients, equipment, tools, retail pricing, consumer trends, delivery, on site construction and client consultation. Produce several single layer and tiered cakes, incorporating advanced techniques; including buttercream, rolled fondant, pastillage, royal icing piped decorations and gum paste flowers. Utilize other techniques such as over-piping, bridgework, stringwork, smocking, painting, embossing, airbrushing, applique and stenciling.

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BAK 265 Comprehensive Retail Baking Operations (5 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 140 or CUL 140.

Learn business concepts for building a successful bakery enterprise and apply those concepts in a real-world setting. The instructor guided lab is ideal for students wanting to start their own retail bakery and test ideas in a secure setting. Create and sell products in the bakery kiosk using current baking production methods and equipment. Apply baking production techniques and business theory in the retail arena.

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BAK 280 Baking and Pastry Arts Industry Internship (1-6 Credits)

Prerequisites: BAK 140.

Provides supervised work experience designed to expand career knowledge and experiential confidence while increasing knowledge, speed, timing, organization and the ability to execute industry skills repetitively. Includes a diverse work experience designed on a systematic rotation of different stations in the kitchen, dining room, and general operations positions.

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BAK 288 Special Studies: Baking and Pastry Arts (1-6 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the baking and pastry discipline.

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BAK 298 Independent Study: Baking (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

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BAK 299 Selected Topics: Baking and Pastry Arts (1-6 Credits)

Provides a learning experience in baking and pastry arts not currently available; this course is in development to be proposed as a permanent course.

View Course Outline

CUL 100 Want to be a Chef? (2 Credits)

This course serves as an introduction to the field of culinary arts. Students considering declaring either Culinary Arts or Baking and Pastry Arts as a major, or students taking courses to enhance their placement scores to enter the next Cascade Culinary Institute cohort start, will find that this course will enable them to experience an introduction to cooking with a demonstration-based class that covers the basics of cooking technique and flavor profiling. Students will “get a taste” of the restaurant industry, while learning the secrets of being a successful culinary professional.

View Course Outline

CUL 101 Introduction to Culinary Arts (4 Credits)

Experience the basic theory and skill sets used throughout the field of culinary arts. Topics covered include the use of hand tools and equipment found in the professional kitchen, as well as the exploration of ingredients and their functions. Students will gain a working knowledge of the fundamentals of kitchen operations, basic knife skills; an overview of stock, sauce and soup preparation; and coverage of the primary dry heat, moist heat and combination heat cooking methods. Students will also taste and evaluate products they create in class to enhance their understanding of the course material.

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CUL 102 Food Safety and Sanitation (2 Credits)

Learn causes and prevention of foodborne illnesses, how to handle foodborne illness outbreaks and emergencies, good personal hygiene, time and temperature control, preventing cross-contamination, safe food preparation, receiving and storing food, methods of thawing, cooking, cooling, and reheating food and Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP). Take the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation (NRAEF) ServSafe™ examination and earn a certificate with a passing grade. P/NP grading.

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CUL 104 Applied Math for Culinary Arts (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: MTH 015 (or higher) or minimum placement Math Level 7.

Learn culinary mathematics including customary and metric units of measurement, decimals and fractions, unit conversions, yield percent, food and beverage costing and markup methods, kitchen ratios, baker’s percent and butcher’s yield percent.

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CUL 105 International Exchange Preparation (2 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval.

Explore the social and cultural aspects of various countries including their cuisine, language, music, art, celebrations, and rituals. This serves primarily as a preparatory course for the Cascade Culinary Institute’s Exchange Program. P/NP grading.

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CUL 110 Culinary Foundations I (4 Credits)

Prerequisites with concurrency: CUL 102; CUL 104; and either WR 121 or BA 214.

Learn the history of the culinary industry, nomenclature, equipment, kitchen operations, basic knife skills, cooking methods, and ratios and techniques in contrast to recipe usage. Learn about and produce stocks and soups.

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CUL 140 Culinary Foundations II (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 110.

Learn about and prepare classical mother sauces, contemporary sauces, small sauces, vegetables, grains, starches, pasta, and eggs. Use food science principles related to primary cooking techniques, show station organization, workflow and overall time management. Practice proper use of commercial equipment and reinforcement of understanding of ingredients, measurement, formulas, and techniques.

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CUL 170 Culinary Foundations III (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 140.

Identify, butcher, fabricate, and cook a variety of meat, poultry and seafood products emphasizing proper technique. Practice small sauce production and the preparation of vegetables, grains, legumes and pastas as accompaniments. Apply modern composition and presentation techniques utilized in the restaurant industry.

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CUL 180 Modern Garde Manger (4 Credits)

Prerequisites with concurrency: CUL 140.

Learn about and prepare cold foods such as canapés, hors d’oeuvres, salads, sandwiches, cold soups, cheeses, forcemeat, condiments, crackers, and pickles. Learn about the role of garnishes, food preservation, and contemporary buffet presentation.

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CUL 188 Special Studies: Culinary Arts (1-6 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

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CUL 199 Selected Topics: Culinary Arts (1-6 Credits)

Provides opportunity for students with exceptional background or need to continue beyond normal Culinary Arts program content. Content and credit(s) earned are established by mutual agreement between instructor and student and detailed in written agreement at the start of the term.

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CUL 200 Comprehensive Kitchen Operations for the Restaurant Industry (5 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 140 or BAK 140.

Recommended preparation: Culinary Arts Majors: BAK 101, Baking & Pastry Majors: CUL 101.

Learn to prepare modern and seasonal dishes in a restaurant setting putting previously learned skills into practice in the college's dining room. Emphasis on cooking techniques and ingredients used in contemporary and classical cuisines and cover planning and ordering for production, station organization, preparation and plating, timing, palate development and other production realities of a restaurant.

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CUL 203 Food Truck Operations (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170 or BAK 170.

Recommended preparation: CUL 200.

Covers owning and operating a food truck or cart. Uses the tools needed to formulate a food truck concept to turn it into a standardized plan. Focuses on menu planning, truck/cart design and location, government regulations, licenses, and permits. Requires local travel.

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CUL 220 International Cuisine and Global Flavor Profiling (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 140.

Trace common global ingredients used in many regional dishes. Explore other cultures through the understanding of global culinary heritages. Examine food in the context of culture, geography, history and the influences cuisines have had on each other. Learn how the attitudes and tastes of more global and knowledgeable customers creates the expectation of diversity in a professional culinarian's repertoire.

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CUL 225 Applied Harvesting and Food Preservation Principles (4 Credits)

Learn about the importance of sourcing seasonal foods relating to pricing, flavor, and quality. Conduct harvesting techniques of plant based foods, and participate in slaughtering process of animal based foods. Process the harvested items and apply a diversity of preservation techniques including canning, smoking, pickling, freezing, freeze-drying, dehydrating, etc. Execute a final harvest event for regional farmers and ranchers to celebrate the partnership with them and the Cascade Culinary Institute.

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CUL 230 Culinary Nutrition and Applied Techniques of Healthy Cooking (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 140 or BAK 140.

Prepare flavorful food and study its impact upon the body. Learn about current dietary guidelines, along with the function of nutrients within the body. Execute modern, healthy cooking techniques in the lab portion of this course exposing students to meeting nutritional needs and requests of health conscious diners. Learn about healthful menu and recipe design and reengineer classical recipes, producing healthful and flavorful alternatives.

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CUL 235S Farm-to-Table and Sustainable Cuisine Practices (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 200.

Serves as an overview of sustainable harvesting techniques for plants and animals and the application of preservation techniques. Students will learn about the importance of sourcing seasonal foods as it relates to pricing, flavor and quality. Students will conduct harvesting techniques of plant based foods, and participate in the slaughtering process of animal based foods. Students will process the harvested items and conduct a diversity of preservation techniques to include canning, smoking, pickling, freezing, freeze-drying, dehydrating, etc. Students will execute a final harvest event for regional farmers and ranchers to celebrate the partnership with Cascade Culinary Institute and local sustainable agricultural partners.

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CUL 240 Butchery (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

Learn about the muscle and bone structure of beef, veal, pork, lamb, game, poultry and specialty meats; fabricate sub-primal and foodservice cuts; and apply tying and trussing methods. Introduction to meat inspection processes, quality and yield grading, costing and yield testing, purchasing specifications, and basic information concerning the farm-to-table trail. Discuss preferred cooking methods for all meats, proper knife selection, and butchery equipment. Sanitation and safety standards are emphasized throughout.

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CUL 242 Charcuterie (4 Credits)

Prerequisites with concurrency: CUL 240.

Learn professional skills in variations of hors d’oeuvres and savories, seasonings, condiments, stuffed meats and curing, pickling and smoking of meat, fish and poultry. Develop proficiency in sausage-making, pâtés, terrines, galantines, and stuffed meats. Prepare a variety of charcuterie products from fresh sausage to dry cured salamis.

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CUL 245S Modernist Cuisine and the Evolution of Cooking (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

Learn about and apply techniques of spherification, thermal immersion, liquid nitrogen for flash freezing, hydrocolloids for thickening and gelling in the kitchen to a variety of foods. Review food pairing methods with the goal of inspiring new food combinations which are theoretically sound on a basis of their flavor.

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CUL 255S Event Planning and Execution with Modern Banquet Cookery (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course examines the varied ways in which banquets and catering events may be executed. Terms relating to equipment, food preparation, service and presentation will be discussed. Students will prepare a menu each day, following the principles and techniques associated with preparing and serving food to large groups, as well as concentrating on principles of modern batch cookery. An emphasis will be placed on maintaining quality and foundational cooking methodology. Students will also learn how to organize, plan and operate a banquet kitchen. Cooking applications are at an advanced level in preparation for later work in the public restaurants.

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CUL 265S Advanced Skill Development and Culinary Competition Mastery (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

Competitions play a vital role in culinary arts as they continually raise the standards of culinary excellence. There is no better way for culinarians to hone their craft than by putting their skills and knowledge to the test in a competitive format. Continually raises the standards of culinary excellence and professionalism. Nurtures the creativity of individual chefs. Provides a showcase for individual skills, techniques and styles.

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CUL 270 Culinary Arts Capstone (5 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170 or BAK 170, and CUL 200.

A culmination of all the skills learned in the Culinary Arts program. Students operate a fine dining, a la carte restaurant and demonstrate back of the house skills (food safety and sanitation, knife cuts, dry heat cooking methods, moist heat cooking methods, combination cooking methods, vegetable cookery, starch cookery, sauce cookery, and final plate presentation) as well as guest interaction and dining room service.

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CUL 276A Regional World Cuisines: Africa (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine-Africa. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 276C Regional World Cuisines: Caribbean (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine-Caribbean. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 276F Regional World Cuisines: France (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine--France. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 276G Regional World Cuisines: Germany (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine-Germany. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 276I Regional World Cuisines: Italy (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine-Italy. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 276J Regional World Cuisines: Asia (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine-Asia. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 276S Regional World Cuisines: Spain (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170.

This course utilizes ingredients and techniques used in a specific regional cuisine-Spain. It combines lecture, demonstration, application, and presentation as a means to explore a culture through the understanding of its food. Students examine food in the context of culture, geography, history, and the influence a region’s cuisine has worldwide.

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CUL 280 Culinary Arts Industry Internship (1-6 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 140.

Serves as a supervised work experience within the culinary arts industry designed to expand career knowledge and experiential confidence while increasing knowledge, speed, timing, organization and ability to execute industry skills on a repetitive basis. Students will receive a diverse work experience that is designed on a systematic rotation of different stations in the kitchen, dining room and general operations positions. Students can complete 100% of the experience in competencies that are relevant to the program curriculum, as it is outlined in the course syllabus and internship agreement. The internship is concluded by a final supervisor evaluation.

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CUL 288 Special Studies: Culinary Arts (1-6 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the discipline.

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CUL 298 Independent Study: Culinary (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

CUL 299 Selected Topics: Culinary Arts (1-6 Credits)

Provides opportunity for students with exceptional background or need to continue beyond normal Culinary Arts program content. Content and credit(s) earned are established by mutual agreement between instructor and student and detailed in written agreement at the start of the term.

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HM 101 Introduction to Hospitality (4 Credits)

Provides an overview of the hospitality and tourism industry, its growth and development, industry segments and their distinguishing characteristics, trends and current concerns. Introduction to career opportunities and the employability skills needed to succeed in specific hospitality fields.

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HM 130 Hospitality Industry Supervision and Principles of Leadership (4 Credits)

Learn the management/supervision/leadership responsibilities in the typical lodging and/or food service establishment. Stresses leadership, communication, morale, motivation, training, team building, and employee development and retention unique to lodging and food service operations.

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HM 150 Procurement, Ingredient Identification and Food Cost Control (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 104.

Learn the principles of cost control, product yield tests, vendor relations and procurement, and an introduction to ingredient identification and tasting. Exposure to profit and loss statements, and how to track cost as it relates to the flow of food. Place, receive and store food orders, conduct quality assurance on all food items, and execute an electronic end-of-month inventory.

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HM 160 Wine and Specialty Beverage Management and Service (3 Credits)

Explores organization of a beverage program within the operation of a hospitality business. Introduces the world of wine and beverage including beer and distilled beverages. Emphasizes major wine regions, varietals, viticulture, the winemaking process, and food and wine pairings.

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HM 188 Special Studies: Hospitality Management (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the hospitality management discipline.

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HM 190 Dining Room Operations (5 Credits)

Covers elements of customer service in a real-life dining room setting including culture and delivery, standards of service, causes of service breakdowns, and service recovery techniques. Provides customer service strategies using systems, technologies, and communication skills to serve diverse customer needs. Emphasizes service styles and guidelines, guest relations, management systems, and equipment identification and handling. Results in the following industry certifications: Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) Alcohol Service Permit and the Federation of Dining Room Professionals (FDRP) Dining Room Associate and Wine Steward Associate Certificates.

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HM 199 Selected Topics: Hospitality Management (1-4 Credits)

This course is in development.

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HM 210 Menu Composition and Analysis (3 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 104.

Analyze menu design and effectiveness for a diversity of local restaurant establishments. Learn about standardized recipes and cost cards, understanding income and profit and loss statements, nutritional aspects of menu planning and design, and menu configuration. Analyze and critique industry menus and create menus from the perspective of concept, clarity, cost, price, and efficiency. Conduct an analysis of the sales mix for the Elevation Restaurant as part of a group assignment, evaluate the sales distribution of food and beverage items and give presentations to the Elevation staff as to how to make perspective design and offering improvements.

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HM 230 Lodging Management (4 Credits)

Explore current operational practices of lodging operations throughout the world. Study management functions related to front office, housekeeping, marketing, reservations, maintaining customer accounts, laws affecting lodging operations and typical service problems. Go on field trips to learn about different kinds of lodging operations throughout the state.

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HM 240 Hospitality Law (4 Credits)

Recommended preparation: (BA 214 or WR 121) and HM 101.

Learn about the hotel/guest relationship, innkeeper's lien, crimes against innkeepers, overview of employment rights, policy formulation, duty to protect guests and their belongings, ejection of guests and non-guests, and an introduction to general business law dealing with torts and contracts. Issues concerning travel law will be included.

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HM 275 Mixology and Beverage Operations (4 Credits)

Prerequisites: Instructor approval and Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) Server Permit.

Create a wide variety of classic and everyday mixed drinks in a standard bar setting. Learn about bar glassware and equipment identification, pouring techniques, common cocktail mixing methods, history of distilled spirits, origin and characteristics of various distilled spirit brands, distillation process, bartenders job description and responsibilities, cost control, beverage pricing and responsible alcohol service.

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HM 280 Hospitality Management Industry Internship (1-6 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Serves as a supervised work experience within the restaurant management / hospitality industry designed to expand career knowledge and experiential confidence while increasing knowledge, speed, timing, organization and ability to execute industry skills on a repetitive basis. Students will receive a diverse work experience that is designed on a systematic rotation of different stations that related to management functions within a restaurant or hospitality industry venue. Students can complete 100% of the experience in competencies that are relevant to the program curriculum, as it is outlined in the course syllabus and internship agreement. The internship is concluded by a final supervisor evaluation. P/NP grading.

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HM 288 Special Studies: Hospitality Management (1-4 Credits)

Explores topics of current interest in the hospitality management discipline.

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HM 290 Career Success and E-Folio Presentation (2 Credits)

Prerequisites: CUL 170 or BAK 170.

Finalize your Cascade Culinary Institute eFolio including updated, effective résumés, cover letters, reference letters, and photos of prepared dishes, class projects, and certificates earned during study at CCI. Learn about career opportunities, networking, volunteerism, and interview techniques.

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HM 298 Independent Study: Hospitality Management (1-4 Credits)

Prerequisites: instructor approval.

Recommended preparation: prior coursework in the discipline.

Individualized, advanced study to focus on outcomes not addressed in existing courses or of special interest to a student. P/NP grading.

View Course Outline

HM 299 Selected Topics: Hospitality Management (1-4 Credits)

Provides a learning experience in hospitality management not currently available; this course is in development to be proposed as a permanent course.

View Course Outline

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